Date:   Oktober 19, 2019

Project: The New Bruggerhorn Lakeside Beach Resort, 2019
Type: Competition
Location: St. Margrethen, Switzerland
Architect: Jens Brinkmann
Landscape architecture: Donald Jacob, Basel, Switzerland
Status: Completed

The Bruggerhorn is a bathing lake with a view of the foothills of the Vorarlberg Alps. Since the middle of the twentieth century, it has been used as a public bathing spot. The Bruggerhorn was created as a quarry pond for gravel extraction and has historical significance as part of the old Rhine riverbed. In the dialogue between bathing culture and social function, the beach and the Bruggerhorn campsite are today an important part of urban culture in the municipality of St. Margrethen.

The concept for urban development and open space proposes separating access to the beach, restaurant and camping site. The visitor’s path to the beach is significantly enhanced, leading from the access road, past the cash desk area, the cloakroom wing, over the new terrace, directly to the sunbathing lawn.

The gently sculpted access to the water includes a new south-facing footbridge. It provides safe access while offering a new quality of place through a terraced stair for sunbathing and a small beach for children.

 

The design concept for the new Bruggerhorn beach is based on three central considerations:

 

1) Building as Connection

The new building links the open sunbathing lawn on one side with the small path system of the campsite. It is divided into six single-storey building blocks of different lengths with a saddle roof.

 

2) New Entrance

The design combines three structures to create a new overall form. Two of the buildings are connected, while the third is a freestanding building that marks the new entrance to the beach. Finally, a light, wooden and weatherproof roof construction spans the checkout area.

 

3) Interior Space as Open Space

The spatial qualities of the interior lie in the creation of a flexible, open space. In the restaurant and in the cloakroom wing there are room sequences of two and three roof panels, whose construction contributes to the overall impression of openness.